Barb And Star Go To Vista Del Mar – Lovable and Kitschy Good Fun!

Kristen Wiig (L) and Annie Mumolo (R), Photo: Cate Cameron

On the fence of what to watch to keep you entertained, while we collectively, stay home to weather the uncertainty of our existence? Look no further than Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar, starring Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumolo – the dynamic female duo responsible for the hilarious Oscar-nominated comedy, Bridesmaids, deliver a ridiculous and funny film – yet again. With Writer/Actor/Producer credits under their belt, Mumolo and Wiig, bring a whole new meaning to kitsch – they actually make it cool. According to Mumolo, the completed story for the film took many drafts and years to make, and both her and Wiig were thrilled to see these characters come to life.  

Jamie Dornan, Photo: Cate Cameron

So who are these memorable characters? The premise: Barb and Star have known each for most of their lives and come from the fictitious Midwestern city of Soft Rock, Nebraska. After recently being laid off from their dream job at Jennifer Convertibles, the delightfully chatty middle-aged best friends embark on journey of self-discovery and freedom from inhibitions at the Vista Del Mar resort in Florida. What ensues is a trippy and colorful story of a friendship tested by an amorous encounter with Edgar, played by the charismatic, Jamie Dornan, from the famed 50 Shades of Grey trilogy. Who knew Mr. Grey had comedic timing? Well, the dramatic actor who’s played him in the last 3 titillating films – that’s who. Dornan is fantastic as he sings, leaps, and rolls around in the sand, professing his love for his boss and villain in the movie, Sharon Gordon Fisherman, also played by Kristen Wiig. Wiig’s Fisherman villain is reminiscent of her kooky character, Alexanya Atoz from Zoolander 2. Fisherman’s zany plot to destroy the made-up Floridian city, where Barb and Star are vacationing, is as nutty as her costume and make up, also nothing short of spectacular.

Kristen Wiig (L) and Annie Mumolo (R), Photo: Cate Cameron

Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar serves up the type of escapism and joy a movie should provide. Mumolo and Wiig do a superb job of giving these quirky and enchanting characters, in their late forties, a refreshing narrative injected with marvelous musical numbers. Directed by Josh Greenbaum, and also produced by Will Ferrell and Adam Mckay, the Lionsgate film has a running time of 106 minutes, is currently out on all major streaming platforms, arrives on digital March 26th, and will be out on Blu-ray April 6th. For more information on the Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar, click here.

Amara La Negra’s Star Power Continues to Illuminate: Undeterred by the Pandemic Lockdown, ‘The Love and Hip Hop: Miami’ Personality Pursues Bigger Aspirations

Amara La Negra, Photo: Tag Media Group

Diana Danelys De los Santos, otherwise known as Amara La Negra, ascent into fame didn’t happen overnight. The singer/songwriter/author and TV host has been in the limelight since age 4 as part of “Sábado Gigante’s” el Clan Infantil (children clan), hosted by Don Francisco. “Sábado Gigante” was the holy grail of entertainment for Latino households across the U.S. – a variety show filled wild performances, comedy skits, games, and lots of models. On for 53 years and acknowledged by the Guinness World Record as the longest-running variety show, it shaped Latino television as we know it.  As a teen, if I dared to change the channel – I’d be punished by my parents or encounter a flying chancleta. I remember watching Amara dancing with other little girls – the only Afro-Latina in the group with energy to spare.

I’ve hummed her songs (Ayy and Se Que Soy) and seen her on “Love and Hip Hop: Miami”, but recently watched her on HBO’s “Habla Now” documentary discussing colorism in the Latin community. Out of the 14 celebrities that spoke on Latinidad and their experiences in the U.S., Amara’s words resonated with me: “Colorism and racial issues happen among Latinos as well. We can be very racist amongst Latinos with one aonther. And that’s the truth!” Amara went on to say, “We consistently are trying to see what nationality is better than the other. What race is better? We create this division amongst ourselves. If we don’t see each other as equals we’re never going to be able to grow and feel empowered.”  Quite the statement, calling out the hypocrisy in our own cultures, I was drawn to her candor. And reached out for an interview. We chatted about everything from her experience on reality TV, to reinventing herself during the pandemic, to building generational wealth among Latinos.

You’ve accomplished so much before the age of 30. Singer/Author/Actress/TV Host. That’s Quadruple Threat Status. What are you most passionate about and can’t live without doing?

Yes, I guess I am a quadruple-threat (laughs). Being on stage, that’s it. I love performing. I love getting dressed up. I love my dancers and rehearsing with them. I’m a showgirl. I grew up admiring Tina Turner, Janet Jackson. People that put on a show. I love being in contact, in touch with the audience. Feeling that we have a connection. That’s why I appreciate my fans so much.

“Love and Hip Hop: Miami” is in its 3rd season and you are one of the breakout stars that has gained popularity. Has production resumed and do the producers coerce or suggest that you engage in certain situations that are scripted?

Love and Hip Hop: Miami” isn’t scripted. I would never bad mouth my producers, no matter what my thoughts are, out of respect and gratitude. But I will say some scenarios are not the ones that exist in my day-to-day life. When you’re on a reality TV show, you have to confront certain situations. Me, away from the camera, I don’t have time for these exchanges and I leave. I’m not a fan of the drama. People place artists, celebrities on a pedestal. Thinking it’s impossible for them to get upset. In real life, people have real personalities – no matter how much you admire them, they have good and bad days. Sometimes you might get them on bad day.

Do you find at this point in your career you still have to explain your Afro-Latina heritage to new members on the show or anyone else you encounter?

When it comes to the show, I’ve made my stance known and everybody knows I’m Afro-Latina. I don’t think I’m the most famous Afro-Latina and everyone should know who I am. I don’t see myself that way. Will I continue to answer questions about my ethnicity and background, if people have questions and don’t know? Definitely. As long as it comes from an educational place, not a disrespectful place and they want to learn.

Amara La Negra in Tu Cara Me Suena, Photo: Amara La Negra’s Instagram

You’ve recently been co-hosting “Tú Cara Me Suena” on Univision. What has that experience been like?

I’ve been with Univision with a long time. I basically grew up in Univision. I never thought as an adult I’d see myself hosting with the network. I’m lying. I’m lying. When I was younger that was my dream. When I used to See Lili Estefan on “El Gordo y La Flaca” I said: One day I want to be a host and do what she’s doing. It’s surreal that I’ve been doing it for the last 2 years. I hosted” Premios Juventud,” “Mira Quién Baila” backstage, and “Sal y Pimienta.”I’m doing another awards show in November, legally, I can’t mention it. But it’s big for Latinos. It’s a blessing. Feels good. I’m able to break barriers for others to come. I’m giving young girls and young men that come from the Afro-Latino community, like me, visibility. It wasn’t easy. I’ve been very vocal about it, but I was able to get a spot. And thanks to this spot, I’m able to open doors for others.

Do you feel Afro-Latina celebrities are scrutinized more as opposed to non Afro-Latina celebrities?

It’s really hard. I’m just speaking for myself. I have only but the best intentions. I’ve never wanted to make anyone feel uncomfortable or offend anyone’s culture or religion, etc. A lot of times, people have these really high standards for me because I’ve become one of the most recognizable faces for the Afro-Latino community, not just as an artist, as an activist too. It’s A LOT of pressure because you have to be so careful with what you say, because you may come across as offensive, even if what you say is true to you. I have to think about my career – something I’ve worked so on hard my whole life. A lot of things can be ruined in a second based on my opinions. It’s hard to be real and be yourself, express how you feel, how people view me without jeopardizing my job.

What do you think about cancel culture? Especially if in the past, you’ve made a controversial statement.

People have become very judgmental. It’s very easy to point fingers at everybody else’s mistakes, without pointing fingers at themselves first. I feel we have to give people opportunities, because we’re human. There’s no guidebook to how to live in this world. We learn as we go. In that process, we make mistakes, and we grow. A lot of people make mistakes – that doesn’t mean we should disregard all the hard work they’ve done, their accomplishments, or impact they’ve made for their culture and communities, up until that moment they said something deemed wrong. I don’t think it’s fair.

Photo: Amara La Negra’s Instagram

What are your thoughts on the anti-Black sentiment expressed by certain Dominican communities in Washington Heights, New York?

I’m not 100% informed on the subject, but I heard something. I don’t want to call out Dominicans specifically. Colorism and racism exist all over the world in every single Latin community. The lack of education, the lack of knowledge brings a lot of ignorance to the forefront. The way people react is based off of ignorance. Everyone is trying to find his or her niche. Everyone is trying to find a spot where they belong. It’s also a system that has brainwashed us for hundreds of years – a brainwashed mentality that has been passed down from one generation to the next and so forth, dividing us instead of uniting us. If we united forces, we’d be unstoppable. It’d be crazy. They wouldn’t know how to handle us as a community. Through education, we can press the reset button in our minds and break that cycle for the next generation to come.

Amara La Negra has kept busy during the pandemic, apart from TV hosting, leading on-air radio shows, and partaking in our interview, she’s been buying real estate. The multi-faceted star bought her first home for her mother, Ana Maria Oleaga, last year. Amara said, “She worked so hard for me to become successful. I wanted to give her something in return.” Amara wants to make smart investments as the pandemic has shut down entertainment production across the globe, she, and all of us, have come to realize: you can’t rely solely on just one source of income – a true test in reinvention. She preaches to her fans about generational wealth and leaving future generations with tools and the foundation to becoming successful. She plans on owning 5 properties by the end of 2020; an empowering Latina female artist realizing her potential and leading by example.

Amy Poehler’s Grassroots Biden Funded Event Gave Viewers Much Needed Comedic Relief

From Top Left: Democratic Vice Presidential Nominee, Kamala Harrris, Former Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, Bottom Left, Amy Poehler, Maya Rudolph

If you’re like me, you may be experiencing Zoom fatigue.  Whether it’s for your job, activism, or getting together with friends and business associates via virtual chat – the novelty of this communication method seems to be waning for many. And with the pandemic, thriving in many states across the U.S. – Zoom or other virtual conferencing platforms seem likely to stay. Yet, the virtual Grassroots Event hosted by Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph with guest speakers Democratic Vice President nominee, Kamala Harris and former Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, this week, made me less sour about the medium and restored some of my faith on its benefits.

There were some hiccups, as there always is on Zoom meetings. Someone’s muted; they keep talking, don’t know they are muted, go off to the side, come back and start speaking again and everyone can hear them. In this case, it happened to Amy Poehler: the host. She carried on with her funny animated gestures while Maya Rudolph stepped in. Rudolph attributed to the glitch to a conspiracy plot, while Hillary Clinton blamed the Russians. It was all done in good fun and the mood was light. These two comediennes, who are known to impersonate their guests, knew how to ask pressing questions without the rigidity of typical political discourse and also make us laugh. We found out some interesting facts about the panelists. Hillary likes to nap during quarantine, Kamala has been cooking the same three meals on rotation, Amy has been teaching her kids sign language and Maya has been immersed in playing new games with her children.  The hosts did pose serious questions to Harris and Clinton.

Kamala Harris

They discussed the lack of leadership in the White House, the admission made by Trump on tape, recorded by journalist, Bob Woodward, about how deadly the Coronavirus is, it’s impact, and the near 200,000 Americans left to die because of Trump’s inaction. How Trump projects hostility and can’t take a joke, or make a joke for that matter; a sign, all the speakers agreed is telling of a flawed character.  Kamala Harris spoke about Biden’s plans to address climate change with the devastating fires pummeling the West Coast. Joe Biden’s commitment to unite the country. Both Harris and Clinton couldn’t praise the other enough and Clinton assured conference attendees to watch Kamala Harris emerge as the victor during Kamala Harris and Mike Pence’s debate, scheduled in a few weeks. To learn more about future grassroots events and to get Joe Biden and Kamala elected, click here. Also to learn whether you are registered to vote, click here.

Review: ‘Mucho Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado’ – Nostalgic and Magical!

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Walter Mercado, Photo: Courtesy of Netflix

Growing up in my Latin household, I was guaranteed three things: flavorful rice and beans, the sound of salsa, and exposure to astrological phenomenon, Walter Mercado. I miss and relish all three, but what stuck with me throughout the years is the influence of the latter. I attribute my love of sparkles and all things astrology to the enigmatic Walter Mercado. I can’t remember any other time during my Cuban childhood home, or my extended family’s, where we’d sit in complete silence, listening to Walter Mercado deliver new developments for each sign of the horoscope. We were all captivated by his presence and larger-than-life TV persona. And, come July 8th you will be too, as Netflix begins streaming Mucho Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado globally, to entice – existing and new fans – with this wonderful documentary of the iconic clairvoyant.

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Eugenio Derbez, Photo: Courtesy of Netflix

The documentary begins with a series of Walter Mercado images from the height of his popularity on television, displaying his signature choreographed arm moves to draw the viewer’s attention, and in true Mercado form – he succeeded in commanding it! Millions of Latin families tuned in daily to listen and absorb new astrological insights pertaining to the zodiac. Actor/Comedian, Eugenio Derbez says: “ When I first saw him on TV, I was like, What is this I’m watching? Is it a woman, a man, a sorcerer?” Derbez was hooked! Legions of Walter Mercado fans continue to experience this sentiment. With his grandiose beautiful outfits, soothing voice, and mesmerizing gaze he was unstoppable. Undoubtedly, gender non-confirming Walter Mercado was a pioneer for LGTBQ+ personalities we see today. As the documentary delves deeper into his life, we learn that he refused to adhere to societal rules, and instead, opted to break them.

Mercado, born in 1932, knew he was different from the outset and destined for a different life from that of his siblings and the poor rural area of Ponce, Puerto Rico where he was from. After breathing life into a small bird on the brink of death, young Walter Mercado became the talk of his town and was deemed a mystic figure people sought advice and help from. His mother accepted and encouraged his newfound adulation and set up a designated space in their home for Walter to thrive as fortune consultant. Following his natural gift for entertainment, Mercado enrolled in the University of Ponce and pursued dancing and acting and landed telenovela roles with Telemundo.

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Walter Mercado at home, Photo: Courtesy of Netflix

A momentous visit to the set from the head of Telemundo at the time, prompted Mercado to create a promo for the soap opera that would launch his astrological career. For decades, Mercado’s message of peace, love, and prosperity has impacted Latinos and Americans around the world. He’s the most renowned astrological figure nationally and internationally, meeting the likes of prime ministers, former presidents with special guest appearances on American talk shows. The documentary doesn’t just focus on his successes, tragedy befell the icon, which almost left him for dead and the film does a superb job allowing Mercado, and those close to him, tell his story. Mucho Mucho Amor (Mercado’s signature catchphrase) captures the essence of the legend and depicts his ups and downs with authenticity and grace, from the music to the use of tarot cards. Although Mercado left the limelight and remained dormant for a while, his comeback was almost inevitable as a new generation of adoring fans surfaced on social media and beyond.

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Walter Mercado and Lin-Manuel Miranda, Photo: Courtesy of Netflix

Mucho Mucho Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado directed by Cristina Costantini and Kareem Tabsch, and produced by Alex Fumero has a run time of 93 minutes and begins streaming on Netflix, July 8th. Don’t miss this spectacular documentary and special appearance by Lin-Manuel Miranda fan-boying Walter Mercado as he meets the iconic psychic in Puerto Rico. To learn more about the film, click here.

Rachel “La Loca” Strauss-Muñiz – Get Ready for the Next Household Name in Comedy!

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Photo: Rachel “La Loca” Strauss-Muñiz

Latinos loved to be entertained. We love, laugh, cry and yearn to see our cultural truths and customs depicted – especially on social media. And in recent years, many comedic Internet superstars have emerged and drawn material from their Dominican, Cuban, and Puerto Rican heritage with hilarious content. Taking it to the next level, with popular audio streaming services, is Rachel “La Loca” Strauss-Muñiz, who co-hosts the weekly podcast“ “Latinos Out Loud” on the Revolver Network with Michael “Juan Bago” Diaz, Jaime “JFernz” Fernandez, and Frank Nibbs. Now in its 7th season and winning a Tecla award for “Best Podcast Content Creator” this Latino vehicle is amplifying Latino voices throughout the country. We chatted with comedienne/actor/producer Rachel “La Loca” Strauss-Muñiz to get the inside scoop as to why this multi-hyphenate star on the rise, merits the spotlight. Apart from cohosting “Latinos Out Loud,” Rachel is part of the comedy troupe Room 28, featured on NBC’s “Bring on the Funny,” hosts and produces HERlarious, a diverse and all female collective featuring the best sketch, stand up and character acts in New York. With her involvement in variety of entertainment projects, Rachel is primed to shake up the Hollywood status quo for Latinx.

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Room 28 Comedy Troupe on NBC’s “Bring on the Funny,” Photo: Rachel “La Loca” Strauss-Muñiz

DSMC: What’s your earliest memory of wanting to be in entertainment?

Rachel: I can remember as far back as age 9 when my parents would go out on Saturday nights and leave me behind with my older siblings. They were 9 years older than me. And they’d let me stay up late to watch Saturday Night Live so I’d stop annoying them. I was in awe. These actors would interpret these different multiple roles and act them out. I remember thinking to myself: That’s the coolest thing ever! I want to do this! I was always involved in the performing arts in school, growing up in South Brooklyn, I was very much part of after-school life. Participating in plays, rehearsals, dance, and theatre. Growing up with a Dominican mother, my mom was like “No, mija that’s not going to make you money…Aaa-aah.” So I went to college. Pursued a career in marketing and I never let the acting bug go, once it’s in you – you never let it go. It’s like a parasite and it creeps into your system, until finally, you’re like fine! It has to come out. When my son Donovan was born 4 years ago, that’s when it came seeping through my pores. I said to myself: Why am I here, in corporate America? The money brings me some happiness, but there’s nothing like making other people smile, laugh – entertaining them. I gave all the corporate stuff up and said: Fuck it! Let’s see where this goes. I want to be the mother that I always wanted to be and the actress that I wanted to be. Those are the two things I’ve been pursuing hard body full-time the last four years.

DSMC: Brooklyn College is both our alma mater. At one point they had a thriving diverse performing arts program? Did you receive formal acting training from Brooklyn College?

Rachel: I took a few undergrad classes, but when I decided to pursue acting full time with formal training, I enrolled in private acting lessons with well-known teachers. I’m a two-time recipient of the diversity scholarship at the Upright Citizen’s Brigade. With a career in comedy it’s smart to understand the methods and approaches of the different schools of comedy that are recognized and accredited throughout the world. I began with Improv Comedy 101 and heard about the diversity scholarship. I saw the lack of diversity within the student body. I went for it. I didn’t get it the first 3 times I applied. I just kept at it. Finally, I got the good news in 2016. Since then, I’ve been nonstop. The beauty of being a diversity scholarship recipient is that they hook you up! If there are open seats, in other classes that don’t sell out, the scholarship recipients are the first to get the notifications about open seats at UCB. I’m so thankful. Now that I’m 40, I’m super focused, and want to do everything I can to add “sazón” to the comedy bucket. I’m trying to hone in on where my passions lie and that’s sketch comedy right now. I just finished the sketch writing circuit at the school. I’ve touched on the 3 pillars of the Upright Citizens Brigade (UCB).

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Center: Amy Poehler, Photo: Courtesy of UCB

Side note: The Upright Citizens Brigade, which readers in case you didn’t know – was co-founded by the supremely talented, Amy Poehler, which also founded Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls, bringing to the spotlight incredible women making strides in varied industries. The Upright Citizens Brigade is the only accredited Improv and sketch comedy school in major cities like New York and Los Angeles. To learn more about the Upright Citizens Brigade, click here.

DSMC: You have a lot on your plate with acting, parenting two toddlers, producing, podcasting. You co-founded the podcast: “Latinos Out Loud” What’s it like sharing the airwaves with 3 men?

Rachel: Finding your voice is so important, but maintaining it, is equally as important. Sometimes, all the testosterone around me can easily drown me out. We have this ongoing joke that they have crowned me the Queen Bee of the podcast. And, “Dejame decirte!” I’m not about that life: Oh, bow down! You know, Beehive, but I have to maintain that position. I can get stepped on, not literally, but figuratively. I gotta represent. The female voice within this crowd of funny men is so important. I feel I have to play multiple roles. I modulate and sometimes I have to be the voice of reason, or the voice of femininity. When there’s too much dick talk, and I’m like, all right guys let’s bring it back to comedy.

DSMC: You have a knack for switching up character voices on the podcast, after listening to the 100th episode with Lin-Manuel Miranda Jr. and Sr. as guests, I observed that. Congrats on this milestone! You’re able to do urban, prim and proper, corporate voice, whereas the others on the podcast panelists struggle at times.

Rachel: Thank you, I don’t think I code-switch. I do think it’s important to know your audience. I actually attribute and thank my corporate background for having that ability to modulate, because we need to. I could be hood, but there’s a time and a place. I’m working on me also. I’m a work-in-progress on the Mic. I went from dropping F-bombs on the 1st season every other minute to occasionally using the N- word and that’s not who I wanted to be on the Mic. I still struggle with the F-bombs. I’m from Brooklyn. You know what Im sayin’? I would like to get to the point where I don’t need to say it. The same way I don’t need to say the N-word or curse every other 3 words. I want to be who’d I like to listen to on a podcast. I listen to every episode of the podcast 5 times. It’s my method. I look for errors to edit and fix in the car. To make sure the episode is the best it can be audibly. I’m very structured and anal with voice and what I’m projecting. We take a lot of pride in the audible quality. I get angry when I listen to some of my favorite podcasts and the jokes fall flat, and not because they’re not funny, but the crispness of the sound isn’t there. Nobody wants to hear white noise, black noise, and hear anything else other than the podcast host. We’re all on the same page and I love that. It’s our friendship and our interdependence that makes it thrive. Collectively we’ve been friends for a little over 10 years. We hang out with each other on the side, holidays too. We’re still friends. It’s cool.

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Top (L) Jaime Fernandez, Bottom (L) Juan Bago, Rachel “La Loca” Strauss-Muñiz, Frank Nibbs, Photo: Revolver Network

DSMC: I remember listening to Howard Stern and Robin Quivers, when it was free on local NY stations. And they had great chemistry. They did pop culture, comedy sketches. Sure, it was controversial, but funny. There doesn’t seem to be anything like that for Latinos. What comes close is New York’s 97.9 FM La Mega, and they seem to fall short. What are your thoughts on this?

Rachel: I would love that – to eventually be the Howard Stern, Robin and Bababooey for the Latino market. We don’t have that. We recently had the president and CEO, and co-founder of Casanova Advertising Agency, Ingrid Otero-Smart. She’s Puerto Rican and has been in the industry for a while. We asked her about the current state of Latinos in podcasting? And she mentioned: “You guys are pioneers right now. You are setting a path for those that are going to follow in your footsteps and it’s so important to make the best decisions you can.” There is a huge weight on our shoulders. She’s right. We don’t have a textbook to read, handbook or manual or someone that came before us. What comes close is La Mega, “El Vacilón de La Mañana.” That’s not a podcast!

DSMC: Whenever I heard “El Vacilón De La Mañana,” I’d interpret the skits and majority of the listeners as gullible – a dumbing down of the Latino population that I never liked. That’s not who Latinos are. We’re educated. We’re smart. We are not here to be disparaged. 

Rachel: I appreciate what the Luis Jimenezs’ of the world do. My mom still thinks he’s hilarious. Sadly, I do not. I don’t relate to most of the content. He’s a funny man. I get it and he’s talented. No disrespect. I’m 40 years-old. I’m on a different comedy wavelength than those guys. We have to do our part to elevate this void. I watch SNL, white/black/Asian sketch shows. When I was out in L.A. to do NBC’s “Bring on the funny.” I was in The Ubers – hittin’ up the dispensaries, left and right. One night I was with the director of Room 28, Jerry Diaz, in the back seat. And, the Uber driver turns around and says: “Rachel “La Loca” – Latinos Out Loud.” Yeeees! That’s me. “I listen to you guys all the time. “You don’t know how much we need you.” I said, really, how so? “They feed us this chancletazo bullshit or Mexican-American comedy that we don’t find funny anymore. My friends and I listen to you even though you’re Caribbean, Dominican, even though your jokes have a New York-centric attitude, my friends and me think it’s hilarious. It’s still Latino, it’s still cultural, and we can still relate.” I think this divide we saw in the past, among different pillars, one of them comedy, is fading out – it’s fizzling away. Finally, we are approaching this convergence that black comedy has already crossed, where we are just about each other and NOT where we are from anymore and it’s about the cultural relevance and the unity, especially with 45 right now. Comedy will always be a universal language.

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Daniel Craig on SNL, Photo: Mary Ellen Matthews

DSMC: What’s next for Rachel “La Loca”? Are you doing more sketch comedy? Continuing with the “Latinos Out Loud” podcast?

Rachel: Collectively, the 4 of us are treating this as a business. We are rebranding and redoing our website and looking to elevate the brand for 2020. We are looking to do more live shows – especially with the markets that have shown us a lot of love; right now it’s a tie between New York and L.A. Our top five markets are New York, California, Chicago, Texas and D.C.; it fluctuates. We want to bring more live shows, hopefully with sponsors attached to them across the country. Our listeners hear themselves when they listen to us. They feel like they’re chillin’ with their cousins snappin’ on each other in a living room. We want to do pop-up podcasts across the country.

Rachel con’t: We took 2019 to focus on our network television debut, branded content development and performing in the comedy festival circuit, as well as a bit of company restructuring, and are really looking forward to our off-Broadway return after our stint on NBC’s “Bring the Funny.” We’re proud to have released a 5-part web series written, produced and starring Room 28 players for the non-profit organization Somos Community Care. The goal of the content is to connect our community with in-culture and in-language primary care doctors that can target the ailments that plague our community before they get to urgent levels.  The organization’s research has shown that on average, our people wait until the last minute to seek medical attention when it comes to the ailments that attack their health, thus making it harder to combat at that stage.  We partnered up and created the “Sick!!” series where our very own Jaime Fernandez plays “El Profeta de la Salud,” a Walter Mercado-like character that can predict your health future.  I believe this is Jaime’ best character yet! He’s a stellar writer. The series is available on the MiSomos app or on their web site https://misomos.com/sick.

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Rachel “La Loca” Strauss-Muñiz and Jaime Fernandez

DSMC: You mentioned acting as your passion, apart from the sketch comedy and podcasts, what are you looking to do acting-wise?

Rachel: I’ve set this goal for myself: my manager and I are trying to get me booked on networks with co-starring roles. I’m coming so close! I’m out there. I’m auditioning. I’m getting callbacks. I had booked a gig for Identification Discovery. I did a crime-scene reenactment; I was the principle for one episode. I would love to do a recurring role on a network. Pilot season is coming up. I did background work recently. Over the summer I got a taste for film, I did background for West Side Story, working with Spielberg was amazing, and every now and again I do background for SNL. I don’t want to do steady background work anymore unless I’m absorbing and learning something from it. The goal is to book a feature film gig.  

With the ongoing global pandemic grinding life, as we know it, to a startling halt, Latinos everywhere know how to persevere and make the best of the current situation. And that means getting creative when producing comedy. Whether we turn to memes (JLo and Shakira’s history-making halftime show performances are still on people’s minds and social feeds) or creating TikTok videos to Bad Bunny’s or J. Balvin’s tunes, our resilient spirit will never wane. We just can’t hug or kiss like we used to when greeting people – but we make do! Recently, Latinx has made significant strides with shows like Gentefied making its debut, and with the returning season series: On My Block – on Netflix. Latino visibility only accounts for 3% of representation in Hollywood – a dismal situation at best. But, with personalities like Rachel “La Loca” Strauss-Muñiz committed to breaking barriers in the entertainment industry and paving the way for more Latinx stars, our stories will finally be told and knock mainstream entertainment on its head. Check out and subscribe to the “Latinos Out Loud” podcast on Apple podcasts, Spotify, iHeart and Stitcher today.

 

 

 

Review: ‘West Side Story’ – A Modern And Riveting Revival

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Cast of West Side Story, Photo by Jan Versweyveld

It’s challenging not succumbing to presumptions, especially before attending a remake of an iconic musical. Recently, this was my dilemma, before the global pandemic crisis we are all currently facing became our new normal. The latest production of West Side Story by Tony Award-winning director Ivo van Hove (A View From the Bridge, The Crucible) exceeded my expectations and my doubts quickly dissolved. The electrifying young and diverse cast (most making their Broadway debut) blew me away. And, I’m certain you will be too when you experience the flurry of captivating choreography, impassioned acting, and vocal intonations that will permeate the theatre and leave you speechless.

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(L) Isaac Powell as Tony, (R) Shereen Pimentel as Maria, Photo: Jan Versweyveld

The cast, led by Isaac Powell (Once on This Island) as Tony and Shereen Pimentel, (The Lion King) as Maria have undeniable chemistry. Powell and Pimentel play off each other’s acting abilities and are superb as the infamous angst-filled couple. The timeless story of two lovers coming together in the midst of racial conflict between their families couldn’t be timelier. More than 60 years after the critically acclaimed musical, written by Arthur Laurents, composed by Leonard Bernstein with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, and choreographed by Jerome Robbins made its debut on Broadway and changed American theater forever. Now, it is back to remind us that there is no place for hate and intolerance as these detrimental emotions destroy everything in their path, including love. Originally based on Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, with a storyline focusing on the mistreatment of Puerto Ricans in New York City, the musical’s themes strike a nerve with the rising problem of xenophobia in this country.

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Amar Ramasar, Yesenia Ayala (Center), and West Side Story Cast, Photo: Jan Versweyveld

The phenomenal dancing in this classic Broadway favorite lets audiences follow the otherwise inevitable doomed classic love story. The tantalizing new choreography, by Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker is magnificent. All of the performers glide with fluidity and grace and you can’t keep your eyes off them, especially Amar Ramasar (Bernardo), the classically trained New York City Ballet dancer. Adding to the visual stimulation: the LED screens capturing the dreary backdrops of New York City and handheld cameras projecting each actor’s facial expression up close driving the narrative. After all, this is a modern interpretation of a beloved classic, and new audiences, young and old, will definitely appreciate these additions.

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Dharon E. Jones, Amar Ramasar, and West Side Story Cast, Photo: Jan Versweyveld

West Side Story runs an hour and 45 minutes, sans intermission, and will return on April 12th to the Broadway Theatre in New York City. Yes, a bit of a wait as Broadway actors and staff can’t work from home. If you’d like to donate, please go to Broadwaycares.org. When the lights do come back on, don’t miss Ivo van Hove’s Broadway musical debut with the revival of this widely revered classic and the ageless songs: “America,” “Maria,” and “Tonight,” to sing along. To learn more about the show and get tickets, click here.

Credits: Music: Leonard Bernstein; Lyrics: Stephen Sondheim; Book: Arthur Laurents; Director: Ivo van Hove; Choreography: Anne Teresa De Keermaeker; Set and Lighting: Jan Versweyveld; Costume Designer: An D’Huys; Sound Designer: Tom Gibbons; Video Designer: Luke Halls: Orchestrations: Jonathan Tunick; Music Director and Supervisor: Alexander Gemignani.
Cast: Isaac Powell, Shereen Pimentel, Dharon E. Jones, Yesenia Ayala, Amar Ramasar, Ahmad Simmons, Elijah A. Carter, Danny Wolohan, Jacob Guzman, Kevin Csolak, Matthew Johnson, Zuri Noelle Ford, Daniel Oreskes, Pippa Pearthree, Thomas Jay Ryan.

Illustrious Choreographers Dwight Rhoden and Desmond Richardson Supersede Expectations With Complexions Contemporary Ballet’s New Season!

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L to R: Dancers: Candy Tong, Tatiana Melendez, Eriko Sugimura Performing “Love Rocks,” Photo: Justin Chao

Complexions Contemporary Ballet’s 26th season is back in full swing. Bringing to the stage previous audience favorites from the last two decades and sensational world premieres such as “Kaleidoscope,” “Elegy,” and “Love Rocks”. And, if you’re an aficionado of dance and Lenny Kravitz, you’d be remiss to overlook this magical performance as Complexions pays homage to the Grammy award-winning songwriter and advocate of love and unity.

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L to R Complexions Contemporary Ballet’s Pre-Professional Program Dancers, L to R Dwight Rhoden and Desmond Richardson, Photo: THEGINGERB3ARDMEN

The evening, celebrating Complexions Contemporary Ballet fundraising Gala, highlighted co-founders Desmond Richardson and Dwight Rhoden’s educational initiatives to guide the young dancers of tomorrow through scholarships, mentorship programs and reinforce the artistic directors’ methodology of dance training. A testament to Richardson and Rhoden’s dance instruction was manifested by the dancers from Complexions Contemporary Ballet’s Pre-Professional Program performing “Kaleidoscope,” the aspiring professional dancers are poised, (some hail from as far as Winnipeg, Canada) to join an acclaimed dance company in the near future. Actress, songwriter, and musician Rhonda Ross kicked off the night to remind audience members the importance of dance as self-expression and daring everyone to reach for more – sentiments shared, and at the heart of Complexions Contemporary Ballet’s mantra.

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Singer, Songwriter Rhonda Ross, Photo: THEGINGERB3ARDMEN

Setting the stage ablaze with her statuesque physique and mesmerizing dance moves was Jillian Davis. Davis has been with the company since 2014 and not only does she tower over the other dancers – male and female; she owns her height and glides across the stage with grace and confidence. On this night, Davis’ solo and world premiere of “Elegy” solidified her talents as a solo act and theater patrons will marvel at her performance.

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Jillian Davis, Photo: THEGINGERB3ARDMEN

The final act of the evening was “Love Rocks” – a compilation of Lenny Kravitz’s music catalogue set to Dwight Rhoden’s choreography and performed by the entire company. These dancers did not miss a step. With their beautiful movements, the dancers captured Kravitz’s soulful and sultry voice. “Are You Gonna Go My Way, “ Fly Away,” and “I Belong To You,” – are some of the rock star’s popular songs featured in the tribute. The sensual costume design coupled with equally titillating mood lighting and backdrop, set the ambiance and ended the night on a high note.

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Dancer Tim Stickney and The Company, Photo: Steven Pisano

Complexions Contemporary Ballet will showcase their 26th season now through February 2, 2020 at the Joyce Theater in Manhattan. Do not miss this opportunity to see these incredibly gifted dancers on stage featuring classical, modern, and experimental ballet. To get tickets for upcoming shows and learn more about Complexions Contemporary Ballet, click here.

Credits:
KALEIDOSCOPE
Choreography by: Dwight Rhoden; Staged by: Natiya Kezevadz & Clifford Williams; Music by: African Drums and Soukouss – Beat the Drum, Mari Samuelson, Konzerthausorchester Berlin & Jonathan Stockhammer – November, Michael Bublé – Who’s Lovin’ You; Featuring the Complexions Contemporary Ballet Pre-Professional Program.
ELEGY
Choreography by: Dwight Rhoden; Music by: Beethoven; Lighting Design by: Michael Korsch; Costume Design by: Christine Darch; Performed by: Jillian Davis.
LOVE ROCKS
Choreography: Dwight Rhoden / Desmond Richardson; Music: Lenny Kravitz; Costume Design and Construction: Christine Darch; Lighting and Set Design: Michael Korsch; Sound Design: Corey Folta; Performed by: The Company.

Broadway Review: ‘Tina’ – Riveting, Heartfelt, and A Testament To Tina Turner’s Indelible Star Power

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Photo: Manuel Harlan

Upon hearing that the Tina Tuner musical was coming to town, I had trepidation and a bit of skepticism. As a theatre and musical lover, I had no choice but to succumb to a new rendition of one of my childhood idol’s life portrayed on the Broadway stage. Would the actress playing Tina measure up? Would she be able to convey this powerhouse of a woman justly? Would the music move me? The answer to all my resounding questions: Absolutely! Tony-nominated actress, Adrienne Warren (Shuffle Along, Bring It On: The Musical) reprises her role of rock legend, Tina Turner; Warren had performed ‘Tina’ in London’s West End this past spring with rave reviews. And, now she’s traveled to New York to shatter all expectations of fans and critics alike. Warren’s portrayal of Tina Turner is sensational. The octaves in her similarly raspy voice to Turner’s are spectacular. Warren interprets Tina’s signature moves with grace, sans mimicry.

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Photo: Manuel Harlan, Steven Booth as Phil Spector, Adrienne Warren as Tina

The musical begins with Warren seated on the stage floor wearing Turner’s iconic red leather dress reciting a Buddhist chant. Turner, a Buddhist since 1973, credits the religion for helping her endure life’s hardships. Then the audience is introduced to a young Tina (given name: Anna-Mae Bullock) played by Skye Dakota Turner masterfully, belting out church songs with fervor in her hometown of Nutbush, Tennessee, where her mother, Zelma, played by the talented Dawnn Lewis (A Different World, This Is Us) isn’t too pleased and constantly scolds her for being to loud and boisterous. At the behest of her grandmother, played by Myra Lucretia Taylor (Macbeth, A Streetcar Named Desire), she pursues her talents as a singer, and moves to St. Louis to be with her mother and sister.

The pacing of the musical is perfection. There are no lulls. We transition through the different phases of Tina’s life with Tina’s hit songs and sets so visually stimulating the rest of your senses have to play catch up! The scenes between Tina and Ike are electrifying. Their chronicled relationship is replete with success and abuse at the hands of Ike Turner played by Daniel J. Watts (Hamilton, The Color Purple). Ike Turner is undoubtedly the villain from what is known about his persona and documented past relationship with Turner. Watts does an excellent job of balancing the complexities of Ike, as the abusive husband, yet talented musician that discovered Anna-Mae Bullock’s talents at 17 years-old, Watts is able to convey this atrocious man, with comedic flair at times, while showcasing his singing and dancing abilities. After all, this is a musical and the tone shouldn’t be too gloomy.

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Photo: Manuel Harlan, Adrienne Warren as Tina, Daniel J. Watts as Ike Turner

Executive produced by Tina Turner, directed by Phyllida Lloyd (Mamma Mia, The Taming of the Shrew), and choreographed by Anthony Van Laast (Mamma Mia!, Sister Act) ‘Tina’ is a true gem for biopic and musical aficionados. Run! Don’t walk to see this fantastic production of the Queen of Rock n’ Roll. Tina, The Tina Turner Musical will be on Broadway at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre through September 2020, for upcoming performances, click here.

 

PRODUCTION: A presentation by Stage Entertainment, James L. Nederlander, Tali Pelman, Feste Investments B.V., David Mirvish, Nattering Way, Teg Dainty, Katori Hall, Mark Rubinstein Ltd., Warner Chappell, Peter May, Eva Price, No Guarantees, Caiola Productions, Jamie DeRoy, Wendy Federman, Roy Furman, Independent Presenters Network, John Gore Organization, Marc Levine, Carl Moellenberg, Al Nocciolino, Catherine Adler, Tom Perakos, Daryl Roth, Iris Smith, Candy Spelling, and Anita Waxman, in association with Tina Turner, of a musical in two acts, with book by Katori Hall (with Frank Ketelaar and Kees Prins), originally produced at the Aldwych Theater in London, by Stage Entertainment, Joop van den Ende and Tali Pelman.
CREATIVE: Directed by Phyllida Lloyd. Choreography, Anthony Van Laast. Sets & costumes, Mark Thompson; lighting, Bruno Poet; sound, Nevin Steinberg; projections, Jeff Sugg; hair & wigs, Campbell Young Associates; orchestrations, Ethan Popp; musical supervision, arrangements, additional music & conductor, Nicholas Skilbeck; production stage manager, Kristen Harris.
CAST: Adrienne Warren, Dawnn Lewis, Nkeki Obi-Melekwe, Myra Lucretia Taylor, Daniel J. Watts, Steven Booth, Nick Rashad Burroughs, Gerald Caesar, Holli’ Conway, Kayla Davion, Charlie Franklin, Judith Franklin, Matthew Griffin, David Jennings, Ross Lekites, Robert Lenzi, Gloria Manning, Jhardon Dishon Milton, Destinée Rea, Mars Rucker, Jessica Rush, Carla Stewart, Jayden Theophile, Skye Dakota Turner, Antonio J. Watson, Katie Webber.

 

Urbanworld Film Festival 2019 Review: More Than A Platform for Filmmakers – A Community of Content Powerhouses and Artists Breaking Barriers

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Photo: Courtesy of Urbanworld Film Festival

Urbanworld’s 23rd Film Festival has come to an end but the lasting impression their 78 official film selections made still lives on. Opening this year’s festival was Harriet, directed by Kasi Lemmons (Eve’s Bayou, The Caveman’s Valentine). Harriet tells the story of Araminta Ross, born into slavery in Dorchester, Maryland as 1 out of 11 siblings in her family. She became famous for freeing over 300 slaves in the south as a conductor in the Underground Railroad and integral leader of the Civil War. Lemmons does a fantastic job of portraying Tubman, played by Tony Award-winning actress Cynthia Erivo (Color Purple on Broadway, Widows), as a crusader. This isn’t just another film about slavery depicting atrocities and pulling at your heartstrings. It’s the impossible tale of a true female warrior with incredible perseverance. When we first meet Araminta, she seems scared; she’s illiterate and a bit crass, having suffered a childhood assault, and possessing divine vision and clarity, she executes numerous and courageous efforts to lead her family and others to freedom. This is the 19th century Oscar-worthy biopic we’ve been all been waiting for – the heroine of our dreams makes her way to the big screen. Harriet comes out November 1st. Click here to learn more.

Other narrative features worth spotlighting are DC Noir, and the female-led cast, If Not Now, When?

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Photo: Urbanworld Film Festival, Actor, Gbenga Akinnagbe in DC Noir

DC Noir is an anthology of 4 films based on writer/producer/director George Pelecanos’ (The Wire, Treme, The Deuce) critically acclaimed short stories. Each story is based in Washington D.C. and follows working class characters that in some way or other want to escape their circumstances, yet find themselves riddled with obstacles and propensity for crime. Pelecanos does a remarkable job of capturing the essence and culture of the urban communities he writes about and DC Noir is no exception. Long-time collaborating actor-turned-director, Gbenga Akinnage (The Wire, The Deuce, To Kill A Mocking Bird – currently on Broadway) directs and stars in one of the shorts. Pelecanos hires many of the same actors in his television series and now film series, to portray his three-demensional characters. During the panel discussion after the screening, I saw many familiar faces supporting Pelecanos and the cast and audience members emphasized his stellar efforts to characterize people from the places he writes about with authenticity. To learn more about DC Noir, click here.

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Photo: Courtesy of Urbanworld Film Festival, L to R, Meagan Good and Tamara Bass on set of If Not Now, When?

Next up: If Not Now, When? The predominantly black cast led by stars-turned directors, Meagan Good (Think Like A Man, Minority Report) and Tamara Bass (Krazy Actress Productions) bring a poignant film about high school friends and the ups-and-downs they’ve encountered 15 years later. The film is reminiscent of 90s film, Waiting to Exhale with Whitney Houston and Angela Basset, as it explores the complexities of female friendships and love interests. If Not Now, When? tackles addiction, love-loss, infidelity with grit and honesty. The characters aren’t always likeable and that’s okay, you still root for them. Good and Bass directed the movie by chance, after their original director dropped out. According to Good, “I feel like I’m cheating on acting by saying this, but I definitely love directing as much as acting, maybe a little bit more sometimes.” Good and Bass have been friends for over 21 years and took turns behind the camera. To learn more about, If Not Now, When? click here.

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Photo: Courtesy of Urbanworld Film Festival, Bakosó: Afrobeats of Cuba Film Still

I’m always in search of documentaries that strike a nerve in me – good or bad- and leave me thinking about the subject matter for a while. This year’s Urbanworld Film Festival presented: Bakosó: Afrobeats of Cuba and Skin – two films that have taken up residency in my mind.

I’ve been to 7 of Cuba’s provinces. I was born there and left for the United States at the age of 4. It took my 28 years to finally return to my motherland. And I’ve always wanted to go to Oriente where my mom was from and where the movie Bakosó is based, but I’ve never quite made it there on my 4 trips to Cuba. Habaneros, or those from Havana have always thought people from Santiago were guarijos (hicks from the countryside) and spoke a weird dialect the rest of Cuba couldn’t understand. Wow, are these Habaneros wrong! After watching Bakosó: Afrobeats of Cuba, directed by Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi, and seeing the energy and vibrancy Santiagueros have, I completely understood what the people from the region of my native Cuba had to say and I want to visit Santiago more than ever. The film starts off with Isnay DJ Jigüe Rodriguez’s grandmother smoking a cigar and moving to African chants. African rhythms are a central theme in this documentary. DJ Jigüe takes us through the various parts of Santiago and introduces us to artists making due with homemade speakers and equipment. It’s Cuba after all – electronics and anything for that matter, are in short supply. He also shows us neighborhoods bursting with new dances and young people celebrating their local Bakosó superstars like: Ozkaro Delga2, Maykel El Padrino and El Inka making their music and receiving recognition for their upbeat and innovative contribution to Hip Hop. To learn more about Bakosó: Afrobeats of Cuba, click here.

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Photo: Courtesy of Urbanworld Film Festival, Skin Film Still

The second documentary that made an impact on me was Skin, directed by Daniel Etim Effiong, starring and produced by Beverly Naya. Naya poses the question: Why do women and men bleach their skins and succumb to “supposed beauty standards” they feel they need to conform to? Naya is on a quest and travels to different regions in Africa and interviews public figures, cosmeticians, actresses, beauty entrepreneurs, local women and school children who feel compelled to feed into the beauty myth – that lighter is beautiful. Naya addresses her own insecurities growing up with her skin color and learning to accept her beauty and confidence as a grown up. Naya does a wonderful job of exploring this sensitive topic that is universal and warrants discussion amongst people of color within their communities. Skin color does not merit the worth of a person and Beverly Naya is an excellent advocate for championing this message. Please go see this movie and embrace how God made you – beautiful to the last cell of your body! To learn more about Skin, click here.

Launched in 1997 by founder Stacy Spikes, co-founder of MoviePass and former executive of October Films, for over two decades Urbanworld Film Festival is the premiere platform for emerging filmmakers and musical talent to showcase their work and partner with distributors such as HBO, BET and Warner Media for global exposure. Spikes believed people of color were underrepresented in film and there was a void to fill, and embarked on establishing, what is now known as the: Urbanworld Foundation Inc. Under the umbrella of the foundation is also Urbanworld Digital, which includes esteemed panelists in television and film holding invaluable conversations on how to get great content out there and what the process entails. Gabrielle Glore serves as Festival Director &Head of Programming. To learn more about the Urbanworld Film Festival, click here.

Harlem Stage Debuts The Mystical World of Afrofuturism – Bewildering and Charming Experience

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Movie Poster Still From Film, “ROXË15”

Before attending the Order Out of Chaos, a night of Afrofuturistic short films, music performances and a ‘Mind Share’ panel discussion recently, I had a vague understanding of the term: Afrofuturism. The phrase: Afrofuturism, was coined by Mark Dery in 1993 in his essay: “Black to the Future.” Dery, a cultural critic, essayist and journalism professor, examines the intersection of sci-fi and African pride. According to Dery, “a community of people whose past has been deliberately rubbed out, and whose energies have subsequently been consumed by the search for legible traces of its history, imagine possible futures?” The wildly successful Academy-Award winning pop culture movie: “Black Panther” is a testament to Dery’s hypothesis and focuses on black diaspora and technology – central themes in Afrofuturism.

On this night, Harlem Stage’s audience was treated to two experimental short films delving into the theories of Afrofuturism. The first: “ROXË15”, directed by Celia C. Peters, is a film about a virtual reality female programmer, living in a bleak futuristic New York City setting, searching for a better life through technology, reliving certain events she can’t escape from that prevent her from moving forward; it’s jarring and uncomfortable, but hints at the limitless possibilities technology has to shape our lives.

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Still From “Prototype” Film, From Left to Right, “Android 499” and Sol

The second short, “Prototype,” by writer-director, Christopher Ortega examines human emotions when a black female scientist tests out different android prototypes in her mother’s lab to determine if they can experience empathy. In her quest for substantiated results, she discovers family secrets about her mother and her own existence. It’s “Black Mirror” meets modern-day Telenovelas; and I’m here for it. Would love to see a full-length feature made and have the subject matter explored further.

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Photo Credit: Marc Millman, From L to R, Celia C. Peters, Craig T. Williams, Nona Hendryx, Craig Harris and Darian Dauchan

Post film screenings, director and moderator, Celia C. Peters led a discussion on the origins of Afrofuturism with fellow speakers: Nona Hendryx, acclaimed vocalist, record producer, songwriter of the hit song “Lady Marmalade” and former member of the group, Labelle, Craig T. Williams (filmmaker) of upcoming movie: “Hanging by a Thread,” Craig Harris (jazz-musician) and avant-garde composer, and Darian Dauchan, award-winning actor, writer, musician of the off-Broadway production of: The BroBot Johnson Experience. These talented artists discussed the past, present, and future of Afrofuturism. The role technology plays and one of the first innovators of the concept of Afrofuturism (before it was labeled a concept), Sun Ra – a jazz musician, who infused elements of space and jazz in his work. Sun Ra, in an NPR interview said: “In my music I speak of unknown things, impossible things, ancient things, potential things,” Known as recording pioneer, cosmic philosopher and poet, Sun Ra claimed to be from Saturn.

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Photo Credit: Marc Millman, Nona Hendryx

Following the panel discussion, the galactic sights and sounds of Nina Hendryx filled the auditorium – Hendryx is currently resident Artistic Director for Afrofuturism at Harlem Stage. With her band mate on the drums and the visual backdrop of colorful orbiting bodies, 74 year-old Hendryx confidently sashayed on stage and made her way to the audience wearing a black cat-suit and digital audio tutu with synthesizers; multifunctional fashion. Hendryx is a force. Younger musicians can take a cue from Hendryx’s sultry appeal and career longevity.

Closing the night was Darian Dauchan as his Brobot Johnson character. He raps. He beat boxes. He dances. Moving to simulated outerspace sounds, manifested on screen with shapes and figures, Brobot Johnson (dressed as a robot, complete with silver hair) got the audience pumped and made his performance interactive. It was strange, yet unexpectedly entertaining to watch as some of the loud, pulsating sounds lingered.

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Photo Credit: Marc Millman, Darian Dauchan as Brobot Johnson

For over 35 years, Harlem Stage has been one of the countries’ leading performing arts centers fostering and showcasing contemporary artists of color, bringing exciting and diverse performances daring to be provocative and engaging new audiences transcending cultural experiences. To check out more Afrofuturistic performances throughout the year and explore other phenomenal programs, click here.