2018’s Urbanworld Film Festival Promises to Deliver Groundbreaking Films In Every Genre

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Photo: Courtesy of Urbanworld Festival, (Center: Ava DuVernay)

Now in it’s 22nd season, The Urbanworld Film Festival’s is kicking off opening night with the premiere of Night School, starring Kevin Hart and Tiffany Haddish. Closing the festival is the highly anticipated film The Hate U Give, directed by George Tillman Jr. During its 5-day run, the independent film festival will showcase documentaries, shorts, and features from filmmakers from around the world.

The Urbanworld Film Festival, founded in 1997 by Stacy Spikes, is one of the largest internationally competitive festivals of its kind. Each year, we curate a slate of films representing the broadest lens of diversity across stories, characters, themes, and cultures. We fight tirelessly to expand the definition of “urban” beyond ethnicity to include sensibility, culture, and proximity. We strive to be “the filmmakers festival” and “the people’s festival,” providing a point of intersection where creators and audiences meet to experience bold and diverse artistic works. Expect no less from Urbanworld on it’s 22nd birthday this September as this year’s program promises even more inclusivity from filmmakers all over the globe.

AMC movie theater will host opening night. The Urbanworld Film Festival is scheduled to run through September, for more info tickets, click here.

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The Rosé Mansion Is Open In NYC: Get Ready For The Rosé Renaissance

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Photo: courtesy of the Rosé Mansion

After visiting the Rosé Mansion popup with friends, I was pleasantly surprised after my encounter with the two-foot story space. It will pique the curiosity of not only passerby tourists, situated in the heavily trafficked midtown – but also attract the attention of cynical and jaded New Yorkers, like myself. With its intoxicatingly pink motif consuming the former Charming Charlie’s fashion and accessories retailer, the Rosé Mansion has more to offer than meets the eye. To kick off National Rosé Day, partners Tyler Balliet and Morgan First, opened a first of its kind, Rosé-themed popup in New York City. Wine enthusiasts Balliet and First have been creating popup wine-tasting events for more than a decade with their company Second Glass, founded in 2008.

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Photo: Tyler Balliet (L) and Morgan First (R), courtesy of Tyler Balliet/Instagram

At first glance, the pink décor engulfs your brain with an assortment of pink hues demanding that you to denounce the color, from your life – for good! Yet, as you glide into the inviting and interactive rooms to partake in selfie-dom with the rest of the crowd, each room has a fascinating historical component to it. Upon receiving a rosé plastic wine glass with stickers illustrating popular rosé wine grapes, you can decorate the wall at your leisure and proceed to the rooms labeled: New York, I Love You – which traces the history of how European wine techniques were implemented into the Finger Lakes region and became a huge source for wine production in the U.S. The enchanting and fun-fact filled Sparkling Wine and When in Rome! rooms describe the history of the 6,000 year-old wine industry, and are complemented by colorful and impressionable design. We chatted with Tyler Balliet on his inspiration for the Rosé Mansion and the process it took to launch.

DSMC: What inspired you and Morgan to create a rosé-themed popup experience?

Tyler Balliet: We spent the last 10 years doing educational wine events and large-scale festivals for 6,000 people. We reached a point where it was fun to do these large events but our customers wanted a more intimate experience. At the same time, we could only do so much education and interaction in this large-scale format. We wanted to take the concept of wine-tasting events and reformat it into a place that was more permanent. We looked at bars, places like Eataly, to replicate and instead of focusing on food, we wanted the emphasis to be on beverage. We didn’t want to take over a restaurant because of the logistical challenges. Building out a restaurant is really expensive. Building out a popup bar is much easier and less expensive. There are no ovens or food code regulations involved.

DSMC: I found the historical aspect of the Rosé Mansion fascinating, as most patrons will. Did you partner up with wine historians on the research?

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Photo: courtesy of the Rosé Mansion

Tyler Balliet: I’m a wine expert that’s spent 10 years in this business. We’ve received a number of awards, Inc. Magazine’s 30 Under 30 Award and Wine Enthusiast Magazine’s 40 under 40 Award. I love history and for the last 10 years I’ve had the opportunity to fly all over the world. Meet with winemakers and producers in Europe, South America and throughout California. We didn’t come up with this idea in a few weeks – it’s been a career’s worth of education to put together this experience in a unique way. I made sure to consult with winemakers with 15-20 years of experience – learn the process, the logistics.

DSMC: There are 14 rooms throughout the Rosé Mansion. What inspired the décor when you conceptualized the design for each room?

Tyler Balliet: Morgan, my partner, was in charge of the décor. She’s really good at styling and branding. We wanted to make use of what was already in the space. As soon you walk in, we want you to be transported into another place – somewhere you wouldn’t find in midtown. Morgan worked really hard on the look and feel of each room. She was inspired by her travels over the years and the current design trends she reads about and discovers. I stepped in with the education aspect and together we built the Rosé Mansion.

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Photo: courtesy of the Rosé Mansion

DSMC: The Rosé Mansion will be operational through October 7th, any plans for other popups throughout the U.S.? Will you go on tour?

Tyler Balliet: We love the concept. We love the idea of taking the education and fun of wine to other places. When we built the first one it was like version 1, to be honest, we didn’t know what the reaction would be. You hope after you build it, people will like it. We’re trying to learn what people respond to, what they want to see in the future. I can tell you this: This won’t be last of the Rosé Mansion popups.

DSMC: Since the launch, have most of the visitors to the popup been women, men?

Tyler Balliet: The overwhelming majority of patrons have been women. From the feedback we’ve gotten, both men and women enjoy it. We market it and put it out there and have gotten a large female response. It’s been tough – it’s been really difficult to explain what the Rosé Mansion is to hundreds of people. But once people see it. They’re like: Oh, I get it. It’s one of the problems we had initially before it was built, before we had photos. The longer we’re open, the more people will document what it is, tell their friends about it, and enjoy the Rosé Mansion experience.

DSMC: Rosé has been associated with luxury. Eataly, The Veuve Clicquot Polo Classics, to name a few. Do you have plans on partnering with influencers to expand the Rosé Mansion brand or do you believe the product speaks for itself?

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Photo: courtesy of the Rosé Mansion

Tyler Balliet: We’ve been working with a lot of different organizations and groups. I’ve been in the business a long time. We’ve had a lot of people with a large Instagram following that have come through. I find that a lot of people think wine is complicated. It’s not. If you don’t spend years learning about it you can’t appreciate it– I don’t believe that to be true. I’m pretty good with color. My mom is an interior designer and when I was growing up, I’d say: Oh, that color’s blue and my mom would say: no, it’s not blue, there’s a special name for it, it’s this kind of blue. I didn’t understand what the word was for that, but I could appreciate it. As much as anyone else that did know the word for the color. And, that’s what wine is. Wine is in this place right now where people think it’s difficult to understand, but it isn’t, it’s really simple. If you taste wine and you want to drink more of it, it’s good, if you taste it and don’t want more of it, it’s not good and it’s your opinion. Nobody could tell you you’re wrong. We’ve had a lot of success over the years working with lifestyle publications, influencers, bloggers, You-Tubers. These people fall more into fashion and lifestyle because that’s what wine is: it’s a luxury product at the end of the day.

DSMC: Would you agree that one of the selling points of rosé is its affordability?

Tyler Balliet: The coolest thing about rosé is that it’s not very expensive. You can go to a retail store and buy really good hand-made rosé bottles – that comes from family-owned wineries for between $12 – $15. That’s pretty amazing. It’s one of the successes of rosé. It’s not just a trend. It’s becoming an entirely new product category for a whole new generation of wine consumers. It’s really high quality. Another great benefit: it doesn’t cost a lot to make rosé. Red wine, it takes 3 – 5 years to make a bottle, whereas rosé can be turned around in 6 months. It’s meant to be more of an everyday, easy-to-drink thing. Americans aren’t used to thinking about wine in this way. They think of it as this high-end, sophisticated beverage. And, all throughout Europe, it’s normal, it’s just something you drink daily. Rosé is the first real movement in the United States to get rid of that snootiness. It’s wine. Just drink it. Have fun, but make sure it’s high quality and it comes from a good place.

I love a good rosé and at the Rosé Mansion popup you’ll have the opportunity to taste rosés from around the globe that will satiate your palate. There’s never a wrong time to have rosé. And, it’s here to stay. Enjoy it with your friends, family or alone with your burger or hummus. The Rosé Mansion will be open through October 12, 2018. To learn more about the Rosé Mansion and get tickets, click here.

The Brooklyn Film Festival’s 21st Season is Upon Us: Get Ready for Love, Loss, Triumph and Controversy

The Brooklyn Film Festival is back with a vengeance – an artistic, thought-provoking reprisal – in the form of documentaries, features, narrative and animated shorts meant to strike a nerve, inform and leave audiences with a welcomed or unwelcomed – shock to the system. The film festival kicked off its 21st season at the Wythe Hotel in Brooklyn with a treasure trove of documentaries produced by The New York Times and a mix of animated and experimental films from the Brooklyn Film Festival. The 10-day festival is comprised of approximately 125 features and shorts from 30 countries spread over all continents, except Antarctica. The lineup includes 19 world premieres, 21 from the USA – 37 east coast debuts and 30 first-time screenings in New York City. The festival will present in total 36 short narrative films, 16 short documentary films, 25 animated films and 20 experimental films. There is bound to be a film for all tastes in this roster of diverse presentations from around the globe.

I’m a film buff and constantly seek out new and exciting films – especially independent films that will stake a claim on my brain and will leave me deep in thought for days. Two films that have ambushed my psyche so far: “Lieutenant of the Alt-Right” and “The Story of Esraa.” As the title suggests, “Lieutenant of the Alt-Right” is about one of the members of an extremist, white nationalist group. At first, I scoffed at this documentary, but as I was watched the film’s subject, Eli Mosley, a rising white supremacist leader, whose deep-rooted white male inadequacies was becoming the focus of his drive to spew hate and present himself as an American hero – was quickly challenged in the film. Bravo! To filmmakers, Emma Cott and Andrew Michael Ellis for letting the narrative take shape and expose Eli Mosley and his group’s false, albeit dangerous beliefs, and shed light on to an unfortunate rising movement.

Lieutenant of the Alt-Right, Credit THE NEW YORK TIMES

Photo: Courtesy of Times Documentaries

The second film that left a lasting impression on me is: “The Story of Esraa” – a young 20-something woman who challenges Egypt’s system by attempting to live her life free of her country’s constraints on family, religion, and personal freedoms as she embarks to rent an apartment with her like-minded friends, only to find obstacles and disappointment. This film will resonate with everyone who’s struggled to find their identity and establish themselves on own their own terms. I felt sorrow and hope for this woman, and as I chatted with one of the filmmakers, Mona El-Naggar, Mark Meatto, and Yousur Al-Hlou, I learned about Esraa’s story further. It made me question the freedoms and choices I currently have in the U.S., but for how long? With this administration at the helm chipping away at our Democratic freedoms daily, who’s to say, we can’t find ourselves like Esraa one day?

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Photo: Courtesy of Times Documentaries

The accompanying films on opening night were fantastic as well. The animated short from Italian director Fausto Montanari, “Weird” about girls being different and perceived as odd is a painstaking glimpse of society’s judgmental lens on how we see each other and ourselves. “Deportation Deadline’s” subject matter, by directors Brent McDonald, John Woo, and Jonah M. Kessel is straight from our current news cycle, as many families are continuously torn apart by ICE agents with deportation orders enforced by the Trump administration. The relevancy is strikingly accurate and telling of the injustices currently happening to undocumented immigrants in our country.

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Photo: Courtesy of Brooklyn Film Festival

The Brooklyn Film Festival’s (BFF) theme this year is: “Bad times make great art.” And I for one can’t wait to see what’s in store for the duration of this provocative festival that has been staging international and competitive films and independent production of films and drawing worldwide attention to Brooklyn as a center for cinema. BFF promotes artistic excellence and creative freedom without censure, and has done so since 1998. To see an encore of The New York Times produced documentaries and the Brooklyn Film Festival’s stellar films, click here for ticket info, venues, dates and times. Viva la Cinema!

 

Review: ‘Sancho: An Act of Remembrance’ Emotional, Provocative and Timely

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Photo: Robert Day

If Paterson Joseph’s name doesn’t automatically invoke the phrase “thespian of our time”, then the acknowledgement is long overdue. Joseph’s career trajectory spans over two decades with a vast array of Shakespearean and other notable stage performances, film and television series (The Beach, Aeon Flux, NBC’s “Timeless,” and “Doctor Who,”). The talented and versatile British actor brings to life Sancho: An Act of Remembrance to the National Black Theatre in Harlem with an undeniable vibrancy and a steadfast energy. Written, conceived and performed as a one-man show, Joseph commands the audiences’ attention as soon a he steps on stage.

Paterson Joseph begins with a brief intro to his entertainment background and seamlessly segues into the character he’s portraying: Charles Ignatius Sancho. Sancho, an African man born on a slave ship – who was able to rise from poverty and servitude in 18th century England and become an educated social satirist, composer, abolitionist and ultimately a man of refinement evidenced by his portrait – painted and immortalized – by renowned artist, Thomas Gainsborough. I can’t recall mention of this prominent activist in school and welcomed the education lesson of this character’s vital role in becoming the first British-African to cast a vote in England in 1774; quite a feat for a man of color in this era in history. Joseph does a phenomenal job in reenacting Sancho’s birth, early childhood, and life-changing influences that led to his financial independence as a businessman within the oppressive environment bestowed upon him. Joseph transitions between the narrative with comedic and emotionally charged dialogue with ease. And as a theater patron, you can’t help but glance around the intimate setting, and notice other patrons are captivated by Paterson Joseph’s storytelling ability.

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Engraving by: Francesco Bartolozzi

The theme of oppression and strength of conviction to affect change is so timely in our current political system. This play is more than homage to a man who paved the way for British Africans, rose above unimaginable adversity and triumphed in light of the circumstances surrounding him; it’s a testament to the spirit of man and the belief that change and acceptance of marginalized groups is possible. Sancho: An Act of Remembrance will be playing at the Black National Theatre through May 6th. For more information on the performance and to get tickets, click here:

Conceived, written and performed by: Paterson Joseph; Co-Director: Simon Godwin; Music and Sound Design: Ben Park; Designer: Michael Vale; Lighting Designer: Lucrecia Briceno; Costume Designer: Linda Haysman.